Category Archives: verse forms

Death of the Middle English Virelai

Just a quick post to say that my article on a group of fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century lyrics which in the past were misidentified as Middle English virelais has been published in Medium Ævum 85.1 (2016).  The poems in question are in fact English versions of various French complainte forms.  The article explains how they came to be misidentified, and discusses the imitation of French forms in English.  It argues that this form was recognisable and had distinctive connotations, meaning that it could be used parodically or ironically in some instances.  You can download a copy of the article here:

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A Queenly Prologue & Epilogue

As I explained in a previous post, over New Year’s I stumbled upon a little-noticed prologue, uniquely preserved in London, British Library MS Harley 7578.  It prefaces the Liber Proverbiorum, a mid-fifteenth-century verse translation of an early fourteenth-century collection of proverbs and wise sayings by the friar and preacher Nicole Bozon.  The text as a whole had been edited in two American PhD dissertations, but neither had been published, and so the poem had faded into obscurity.

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#notalimerick

Before Christmas, I read an article by Michael Rosen on Why we love limericks which celebrated the popularity of a new book of limericks by Ranjit Bolt, A Lion Was Learning to Ski.  Given that I’m writing a guidebook to Middle English poetic form, I was surprised to read that ‘the history of the limerick form itself […] stretches back to at least the 11th century’.  Had I missed something?  Medieval limericks, it seemed, were a thing.

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two, four, six, eight, a stanza to appreciate…

The popularity of seven-line rhyme royal stanzas in late medieval and early Tudor verse means that it’s easy to overlook eight-line stanzas, especially those rhyming ababbcbc.  This verse form doesn’t really have a name in Middle English, though eight-line stanzas are sometimes called ballades (meaning a discrete stanza unit such as that used in the French fixed-form lyric, in contrast to verse in couplets or long lines), a word that is also used for stanzas of seven or nine lines.  Fifteenth-century French arts of poetry call this rhyme-scheme ‘double croisée’, meaning that the rhymes cross over each other twice.

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Agincourt: History, Poem, Chronicle

My contribution to the commemorations of the sixth-hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt  is, of course, a poem (scroll down for text and translation).  These stanzas are embedded in a London prose chronicle in British Library MS Cotton Cleopatra C. IV: it’s clear that the author of the chronicle was un-versifying this poem to form part of his account of the battle, before giving up and just copying the stanzas out verbatim.  So here we have a surviving section of another Agincourt poem to put alongside the Agincourt carol and the other accounts of the battle.

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Gleaming like glayre

The theme for this year’s United Kingdom National Poetry Day is LIGHT.  What sprung into my mind, thinking of light in Middle English poetry, was an image of jasper walls gleaming like egg white in a city which doesn’t need the light of the sun or the moon because it is lit by divinity itself: ‘The selfe God was her lambe-lyght, / The Lombe her lantyrne’ [God himself was their lamp-light, the Lamb their lantern].  It comes in what might just be the best stanza in Middle English poetry.

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How to make fun of rhyme royal

I’ve been tracking the life-cycle of rhyme royal, the stanza form (rhyme-scheme ababbcc) that Chaucer developed and used in his Parliament of Fowls, Troilus and Criseyde, and some of his Canterbury Tales in the last decades of the fourteenth century.  In the first half of the fifteenth century, it was the fashionable stanza form that every courtly poet wrote and every reader wanted to read.

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The Techne of Verse-Making: Poetry’s Termes in Middle English

Tomorrow I’m off to London to attend the Biennial London Chaucer Conference.  I’m speaking on Saturday morning in a session on ‘Literary Technologies’.  The title of my short paper is ‘The Techne of Verse-Making: Poetry’s Termes in Middle English’.  It discusses verse-technology and verse-terminology in fourteenth and fifteenth century English poetry, looking especially at balades and lenvoys.  I look at the ‘Lenvoy de Chaucer’ at the end of the Clerk‘s Tale, at Lydgate’s Fall of Princes, and at The Kingis Quair.

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Temporary Lyric in Skelton’s Magnificence

As promised, another example which shows how cleverly and self-consciously late medieval dramatists  exploited the familiar forms of late medieval lyrics in their drama.  At the beginning of John Skelton’s early Tudor morality play, Magnificence, Liberty (i.e. the character personifying liberality or generosity) and Felicity (i.e. the character personifying prosperity and happiness) debate between themselves whether they can happily co-exist.  Felicity argues that Liberty needs to submit himself to ‘Continence’, i.e. moderation, whilst Liberty argues that there can be no wealth or happiness when Liberty is constrained.

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